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Agago District to Get Multimillion Rock Catchment Dams

Denis Jjuuko, the President of Rotary Club of Kampala-Naalya told URN that a feasibility study has been conducted and it was established that through the development of rock surface into a catchment, the rainwater runoff can be harvested and stored into a storage structure for domestic and livestock use in areas that are water stressed.
One of the Agago rocks in Akwang central village, Taar parish in Paimol sub county i

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Agago district is set to benefit from a multimillion shillings’ rainwater harvesting project thanks to a partnership between the Wild Geese Foundation (WGF), the Rotary Clubs of Kampala, Kampala-Naalya and Heemstede.  

Through the project, rock catchment dams and reservoirs will be constructed in villages across the district to enable them get access to clean and safe water. The technology allows the movement of rainwater off a rock surface to a reservoir mortared by long lines of garlands made of rocks.

Denis Jjuuko, the President of Rotary Club of Kampala-Naalya told URN that a feasibility study has been conducted and it was established that through the development of rock surface into a catchment, the rainwater runoff can be harvested and stored into a storage structure for domestic and livestock use in areas that are water stressed. 

According to Jjuuko the areas of Paimol in Agago district, have a lot of runoff generated after the rains and raises hope that the dams will provide the much-needed solution to the water crisis in the area. The project is worth 15,000 Euros (62 million Shillings)   

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The technology is already in use in several arid and semi-arid areas such as Gibraltar and Kitui in Kenya, where the rocks are the major source of domestic water.   

Experts reveal that the capacity of rocks to supply water is significant because a rock surface of 1 hectare (10,000 square meters = 2.47 acres) can provide 1,000 cubic meters (1 million litres) from every 100 millimetres of rain. 

With several rocks characterizing the topography of Agago, even low and erratic showers can supply large volumes of water provided the rock area is sufficiently large enough to compensate for the low rainfall. 

The project aims to help villagers work together to adapt to the area’s increasingly dry climate. The potential benefits of rainwater harvesting include the availability of relatively clean water close at hand and the reduction in time and labour for fetching it. 

Paimol Sub County Vice Chairperson Aryemo Karla Ocen applauded the Rotarians for the initiative to end the water crisis in her area. According to Aryemo, over 1,500 residents in Taar parish, Paimol Sub County, share one borehole and an open well with domestic animals exposing humans to waterborne diseases.