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Black Water Fever Re-emerges in Manafwa

Dr. Emma Gahima, the in Charge Bugobero Health Center IV, says both the district health office and health center are on high alert to attend any emergencies.
01 Aug 2019 07:45

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Health authorities in Manafwa have raised a red flag following the re-emergency of the Black water fever.  It follows the death of 15-year-old, Gilbert Mukwana in Bugobero Sub County. 

He presented with symptoms similar to those of Black water fever patients as he was passing blood in his urine. Black water fever is caused by severe malaria.

 

As a result, red blood cells burst into the bloodstream and release hemoglobin into blood vessels and urine, leading to kidney failure. 

Manafa District Health Officer, Dr. Gideon Wamasebu has confirmed the outbreak, adding that they are studying the situation.

“The situation is like that because we have people who don’t want to report to our health centers but those who have come we have managed the conditions,” he said. 

Dr. Emma Gahima, the in Charge Bugobero Health Center IV, says both the district health office and health center are on high alert to attend any emergencies.  

“We have received information there are people who have symptoms and signs and we are now on alert in case of any emergencies” Dr. Gahima told URN. 

  

    

John Mungasa, a resident of Bugobero town Board, says several residents are in fear. According to Mungasa, in every ten houses, there are at least 7 children suffering from the disease.  

      

//Cue in: I was with…  

Cue out: …have died”//         

Mungasa says he though the disease only affected children aged between 1 and 12 years but was shocked to see a fifteen-year-old succumb to the disease. 

The deceased’s mother, Oliver Namono, says the disease has been prevalent since 2005 but they didn’t know it was black water fever until last year when the cases increases and reported to Bugobero Health Centre IV.  

//Cue in: “inga alabika nga      

Cue out: …afuka omusayi”//      

A nurse at Bugobero Health Center IV who spoke to URN on condition of anonymity because she isn’t allowed to speak to the media, said Black water fever cases are on the rise because of self-medication, which is common among residents.

She said parents give their children quinine without prescriptions from physicians.     

 

Fred Mumya, the Bugobero Sub County LC V Councilor and Village Health Team member, says several people are living with the disease. 

He says they have trained the Village Health Teams to survey the villages in the sub county and report any cases of Black Water Fever.  

//Cue in: “It is there ...     

Cue out: … of last week”// 

     

Last year, 14 people succumbed to Black water fever in Manafwa district, majority of them from Bugobero Sub County.