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Commonwealth Parliamentary Conference: Delegates Criticize Gov’ts On Global Warming

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A section of delegates at the ongoing 64th Commonwealth Parliamentary Conference (CPC) today criticized governments for allegedly not taking steps to curb the increasing effects of climate change.
23 Sep 2019 19:28
Dr. Angelo Farrugia, the Chairperson of the Commonwealth Parliamentary Association Small Branches addressing a meeting at Munyonyo.
A section of delegates at the ongoing 64th Commonwealth Parliamentary Conference-CPC have criticized governments for alleged failure to take steps to curb the increasing effects of climate change. 

This came up during the Commonwealth Parliamentary Association Small Branches Conference at Speke Resort, Munyonyo on Monday. The Conference held on the sidelines of the 64th Commonwealth Parliamentary Conference brings together 43 members of the Commonwealth with populations of less than 500,000 people.

Gervais Henrie, a Member of Parliament from Seychelles noted that matters surrounding climate change are mainly related to political decisions made by government and not just science. He cited the need for political will from different governments and emphasized the importance of politicians to be abreast with information in order to make good decisions.

“It is more like a triangular operation, you have the business people that finance politicians to parliament to make decisions that are implemented by the executive,” said Gervais.

He emphasized the need for more people to be educated on the challenge of climate change so as to appreciate and combat it to save the planet.

Prof. Rick Stapenhurst, a delegate from the McGrill University, said that although climate change affects small states adversely, it is everybody’s problem hence the urgent need for dialogue between small states and the big ones.

Swan Hubert Kim, a Member of Parliament from Bermunda cited an example of the Hurricane Dorian, which recently hit the Bahamas, saying that if the disaster had reached the west of the United States of America (USA), the entire world would be up in arms demanding for action.

“There is a way materialism has so much manifested that small countries need to speak more in unison otherwise they will be divided on a subject matter that has devastated them so much,” said Swan.

 

During the meeting chaired by Dr. Angelo Farrugia, the Chairperson of the Commonwealth Parliamentary Association Small Branches, members commended Uganda for pushing forward issues that affect special interest groups in society, especially through representation in Parliament.

“Uganda is very strong on affirmative action and it was the first African country that actually reserved seats for persons with physical challenges. This is a very impressive move,” said Prof. Stapenhurst. 

He said Small Branches ought to develop legislatures that can fit into their contexts and look to the experience of other Small Branches of the CPA for examples of good practice.