Breaking

COVID-19 Cases Worldwide Hit 12 Million

At the time of the announcement, Uganda had recorded more than 1000 cases of the virus, within a space of three months. With 938 recoveries recorded thus far, there are still 219 active cases and 1,685 people under quarantine.
11 Jul 2020 09:34
COVID-19 cases globally have more than doubled in the past six weeks, reaching 12 million on Friday, the World Health Organization (WHO) has reported. 

The agency chief Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus told journalists that there is still, a lot of work to be done, because “Across all walks of life, we are all being tested to the limit.” The disease has spread around the world, sending billions of people into lockdown, unemployment and despair since first being recorded late last year in Wuhan, China.

The highest number of cases are still in the United States, Brazil, India, Russia, Spain and the United Kingdom The United States has lost 133, 994 people since the outbreak.

At the time of the announcement, Uganda had recorded more than 1000 cases of the virus, within a space of three months. With 938 recoveries recorded thus far, there are still 219 active cases and 1,685 people under quarantine. These include nationals who were initially stranded abroad who were allowed to return home in recent weeks as Uganda started easing restrictions and opening up key sectors of the economy. 

“From countries where there is exponential growth, to places that are loosening restrictions and now starting to see cases rise. We need leadership, community participation and collective solidarity. Only aggressive action combined with national unity and global solidarity can turn this pandemic around”, he said. 

But Dr Tedros cited examples from across the globe which shows that even where the outbreak has been intense, it can still, be brought under control. 

“And some of these examples are Italy, Spain and South Korea, and even in Dharavi – a densely packed area in the megacity of Mumbai – a strong focus on community engagement and the basics of testing, tracing, isolating and treating all those that are sick is key to breaking the chains of transmission and suppressing the virus”, he said. 

Dr Michael Ryan, the Executive Director for health emergencies said that advice includes opening up slowly and in phases, waiting between each stage, and to accept the fact that in our current situation, it is very unlikely that we can eradicate or eliminate this virus. 

He pointed out that even in countries that have achieved zero cases of COVID-19, or near zero cases, the disease has resurfaced. “There is always a risk: either from within or from bringing the disease back in. And therefore, it is a given that there is always a risk of further cases”, he said. 

WHO has consistently advised countries coming out of lockdowns to remain vigilant.

CSOs