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COVID-19 Control Guidelines Tightened at Jinja Pier

Isaiah Tumuhimbise, the port officer of Jinja pier, says that the port has been receiving daily tourists and food suppliers which cannot be maintained in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, where social distancing is paramount.
Part of the Jinja pier.

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The entry of non-employees to the Jinja Pier is now restricted as a means of controlling the spread of COVID-19. 

Isaiah Tumuhimbise, the port officer of Jinja pier, says that the port has been receiving daily tourists and food suppliers which cannot be maintained in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, where social distancing is paramount. 

Tumuhimbise says that due to the frequent sugar exports to Tanzania, the port receives an average of five ships every weekly with an estimate of 15 crew members per ship. But now, he says, all crew members are screened and quarantined on the ship during their stay at the port. 

He stresses that casual labourers who are mandated with loading and offloading goods have also camped at the port with limited access to their communities.   

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Richard Luvaluka, the Jinja district COVID-19 surveillance focal person says that a standby team of four health workers have been set aside to monitor crew members along the Jinja pier. Luvaluka says that health workers have teamed up with the district security committee to deploy at the different entry points to limit interactions between the crew members and the neighbouring landing sites of Rippon and Rock. 

//Cue in; “I want to…  

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