Breaking

Cultural Rights Most Neglected Forms of Human Rights- Activitists

The Cross Cultural Foundation Uganda says the neglect of the Cultural Rights in the Constitution of the Republic of Uganda has pushed some of those rights outside the reach of human dignity on trajectory of permanent disappearance.
The Activists During a Panel Discussion

Audio 4

Cultural Rights have been identified as the most neglected forms of Human Rights frequently facing abuse and violations by the state and the general public in Uganda.        

The Cross-Cultural Foundation Uganda says the neglect of the Cultural Rights in the Constitution of the Republic of Uganda has pushed some of those rights outside the reach of human dignity on trajectory of permanent disappearance.       

Barbara Babweteera Mutambi, the Deputy Executive Director of Uganda Cross-Cultural Foundation Uganda says the rights have suffered Constitutional neglect for far too long for Parliament to do nothing about them.      

Mutambi condemns the continued failure of government to include some affected minority groups in the Constitution saying it is stripping them of their cultural identities.     

//Cue in: “In Uganda, there...       

Cue out: “…. calling them Coope”//    

She says the Constitution still delineates some groups of indigenous minority groups by referring to them in derogative ways and omitting them in its schedule. She cites the Maragoli and the Paluo Indigenous group in Nakasongola and Kiryandongo districts which is referred to as Coope in the Constitution.       

//Cue in: “There are a number….     

Cue out: “….is also violated”//  

Mutambi urged government to cement the neglected cultural rights that have been tagged as objects of tourism in the legal regimes of the nation in view of promoting them.       

//Cue in: “Cultural rights...       

Cue out: “…economy’s GDP”//       

Emily Kinama, the Litigation and Research Counsel says the Communities need to be consulted on how sustainable development agenda will affect the enjoyment of their Cultural Rights.       

//Cue in: “When you look...     

Cue out: “…. whatever they have”//  

The activists were speaking at a dialogue organized by Cross-Cultural Foundation Uganda to Commemorate this year's International Human Rights' Day. It was meant to popularize Cultural rights held at Makerere University School of Law on Wednesday afternoon.

Cultural Rights are defined as sets of Human Rights that aim at assuring the enjoyment of culture and its components, in conditions of equality, human dignity and non-discrimination. They include the rights to access, to express and to enjoy one’s culture with the support from the state.  

Many Cultural Institutions in Uganda are attempting to reassert themselves under the 1995 Constitution which restored their operations through activities such as the Cultural Festivals. 

  

Uganda has signed up to different International Human Rights Treaties seeking to promote the respect and enjoyment of human Rights including the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the 1966 International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the UNESCO Conventions.       

However, the activists say the implementation of those treaties remain wanting. They cite the National Culture Policy 2006 which is yet to be translated into a funded Plan of Action. Other legislation remain outdated and some International obligations are disregarded. 

Images 1

Keywords

Entities