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Danish Embassy Boosts Access to Justice Project in Northern Uganda

Maria Kamara Mabinti, the ICC Outreach Officer for Uganda says that the Access to Justice Project has been extended for another two years to ensure that the communities understand and be part of the court proceedings against Dominic Ongwen at The Hague.
Maria Kamara Mabinti, the ICC Outreach Officer for Uganda and Kenya - Photo by Jesse Johnson James

Audio 2

The International Criminal Court – ICC field office in Uganda has received 820 million shillings from the Royal Danish Embassy in Uganda to boost access to justice in Northern Uganda.

Cooperation between the ICC and the Royal Danish Embassy started in 2017 when they first funded the same project with a tune of 100,000 Euros.

Maria Kamara Mabinti, the ICC Outreach Officer for Uganda says that the Access to Justice Project has been extended for another two years to ensure that the communities understand and be part of the court proceedings against Dominic Ongwen at The Hague.

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She revealed that the additional funding was out of the success of the implementation of the first project from 2017 which included the video screenings of Ongwen’s trial in 23 communities of the four case locations of Lukodi, Abok, Odek and Pagule where the victims linked to the trial of Dominic Ongwen reside.

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Other components of the Access to Justice Project include radio programs in various local radio stations in Northern Uganda and organizing visits to The Hague for influential Acholi leaders to experience the trail of Ongwen.

The Implementation of the second phase of the Access to Justice Project according Kamara will start on August 19th 2019.

Stella Lanam, one of the LRA victims says that the video screenings of the trial of Dominic Ongwen brings back the dark memories of the Lord’s Resistance Army - LRA insurgency, hence traumatizing the war victims.

Jimmy Lukwiya, an elder revealed that out of his interactions with the affected community of Lukodi, he found out that the screenings of the trial of Dominic Ongwen has relieved the victims since it makes it possible for them to discuss it freely and later forget about it.

He adds that the Access to Justice Project has also given hopes to them since they are aware that justice is taking its course.

ICC field office in Uganda at the end of each trial block screens between 30 minutes to one hour summary of the translated trial of Dominic Ongwen. But on key moments like opening or closing statements, verdicts and rulings, it does live streaming for the local community.