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Doctors Detecting Pre-eclampsia in Mothers After Child Birth

Dr. Richard Mugahi, the Assistant Commissioner in charge of Maternal and Child Health at the Ministry of Health says they have noticed an increase in the number of women who develop the condition after delivery.
Expectant Mothers at Kawempe Hospital During Antenatal

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Doctors are recording cases of pre-eclampsia after birth.  Pre-eclampsia refers to a condition during pregnancy where an expectant mother develops high blood pressure.

The condition is characterized by mothers having fluid retention or protein in their urine. It is mostly detected in the six months of pregnancy and can be managed by using magnesium sulphate.

Most of these cases are being detected in women in the first 24 hours after birth.
According to Ministry of Health records, 186 mothers die due to Pre-eclampsia. Dr. Richard Mugahi, the Assistant Commissioner in charge of Maternal and Child Health at the Ministry of Health says they have noticed an increase in the number of women who develop the condition after delivery.


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According to Dr. Mugahi, the majority of the women who develop the condition do not have a prior history of pressure.

"We are seeing healthy women with no previous history of high blood pressure developing it three weeks after delivery. This is very dangerous because there's minimal suspicion that women can develop pressure after delivery," he explained.

Dr Annette Nakimuli, a pre-eclampsia expert says that it is hard to estimate the actual number of cases of mothers suffering from postpartum pre-eclampsia.


"It is hard to know the actual number of women who suffer from postpartum pre-eclampsia since you would have to rule out the mother did not suffer from it prior to delivery. We know the cases are there but it is hard to put a number to it," she said.

Women who are likely to suffer from the condition are; older women, obese persons, and women who have previously suffered from pre-eclampsia. If the condition goes undetected, it can lead to pulmonary edema, stroke, kidney failure, blood clots, and even death.

On Saturday, the country will celebrate the National Pre-eclampsia day in Mbale on Saturday.

According to Dr. Mugahi, Mbale was chosen to create awareness about the condition in the area since it has the highest number of pre-eclampsia cases in the country.  Figures show that the condition in the 2020/2021 financial year was responsible for 67 percent of all admission among women while 40 put of the 65 deaths in the same period were due to pre-eclampsia. 

According to Dr. Mugahi, they are carrying out investigations to ascertain why women in Mbale are at high risk of developing the condition.



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