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Government Chief whip: We Will Not Rush Land Amendment Bill

Gilbert Olanya, the Kilak South MP, says the proposed amendment is unfair and creates an opportunity for corruption and oppression. He says private land ownership should be respected, adding that forceful land acquisition may breed land grabbing in pretext of Government interest.
19 Jul 2017 17:57

Audio 1

Government will not rush to pass the Constitutional Amendments Bill 2017, the Government Chief Whip, Ruth Nankabirwa has revealed. Recently, government tabled the Constitutional Amendments Bill 2017 before parliament for the first reading.

The bill seeks to amend article 26 of the constitution to provide for compulsory land acquisition for government projects. Once approved in its current form, the new law will allow government to deposit the compensation monies with court and take over private land.

The proposal has generated heated discussions with some people accusing government of introducing the law with intentions of grabbing private land. However, the Government Chief Whip, Ruth Nankabirwa, says there is no cause for alarm.

According to Nankabirwa, given the important of land, government will conduct countrywide sensitisation and also listen to people's opinions on the proposed amendment.

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Gilbert Olanya, the Kilak South MP, says the proposed amendment is unfair and creates an opportunity for corruption and oppression. He says private land ownership should be respected, adding that forceful land acquisition may breed land grabbing in pretext of Government interest.

"As MPs we are not happy about the amendment and we will not allow it to pass. The laws that we have in the constitution on land use are very effective. Why does Government come out now on this?” he asked.

Recently, Betty Amongi, the Lands, Housing and Urban Development Minister, said the proposed amendment is meant to ensure Government expeditiously acquires land for major projects. She says key projects in the country have stalled because of compensation disputes.