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Gulu Private Schools Struggle to Implement New Lower Secondary Curriculum

Dorcas Tulina, the Head-teacher of Charity College explains that the school is struggling to access teachers and learner’s guides to enable them to roll out the new curriculum.
17 Apr 2021 14:47
Students Gulu College School chatting a- Photo by Dominic Ochola

Audio 3

Private government-aided schools in Gulu City have decried the lack of learner’s material and teaching guides for implementing the new lower secondary curriculum. In February 2020, the National Curriculum Development Centre – NCDC rolled the new learner-centred curriculum.

However, the outbreak of the global Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) interrupted the implementation of the curriculum as the government closed school as part of the control measures against the spread of the virus. On April 12, the Ministry of Education allowed the resumption of Senior One classes countrywide. 

Now, the administrators of several private schools, say they don’t have the teaching aids to facilitate the new program. Dorcas Tulina, the Head-teacher of Charity College explains that the school is struggling to access teachers and learner’s guides to enable them to roll out the new curriculum.

//Cue in; “The new curriculum… 

Cue out…there is nothing.”//  


The situation is not any different at Bishop Angelo Negri College, a faith founded school. Tibert Amaru, the Director of Studies disclosed to URN that they have not received the learners and teaching material.

//Cue in; “What i have… 



Cue out…from the guide.”// 

Irene Mwaka, the Head-teachers of Gulu Senior Secondary School disclosed that they have received the requisite resources and the concerned teachers are undergoing induction courses for effective implementation of the curriculum.


 

In early 2020, more than 750 teachers drawn from across 145 schools in eight districts of Acholi sub-region assembled at Sacred Heart Secondary School in Gulu City for a week-long training on the implementation of the curriculum. However, the teachers expressed un-readiness to roll out at the time.

At the roll-out of the training Programme for the new curriculum for teachers, Bernard Janja, a Curriculum Development Specialist at NCDC under the Education Ministry encouraged schools to locally mobilize resources to counter the scarcity of materials for the effective roll-out of the curriculum as Government thinks of more funding to facilitate the new development.

//Cue in; “You are going… 

Cue out…them on market.”//  

NCDC has condensed 43 subjects from the old curriculum to 21 under the new curriculum.  Schools will be expected to teach 12 subjects at senior 1&2, out of which 11 will be compulsory while one will be optional.

The approved curriculum will see senior 3&4 learners concentrate on a minimum of eight and a maximum of nine subjects, seven of them compulsory. The school routine will be expected to end at 4:30 pm.

According to the curriculum, teachers will accumulate learners’ achievement from formative assessment in the sequence of four years to find an average score that will contribute 20 per cent in the final exams set by Uganda National Examinations Board- UNEB