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Hundreds Pay Glowing Tribute to Former IGP John Kisembo

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Born on October 1, 1955, Kisembo is survived by 17 children. He will be laid to rest tomorrow in Kagadi in Kitema along Mugalike -Isunga road.
AIGPs and other senior police officers wheeling and accompanying former IGP John Kisembo's casket

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Hundreds of mourners turned up for the requiem mass for fallen former Inspector General of Police, John Kisembo, who died on Thursday this week. Kisembo succumbed to lung cancer.

Mourners who included relatives, children, golfers, serving and retired police officers filled Our Lady of Good Counsel Church, Mbuya, paying glowing tribute a man who was praised for his humility.

Everest Mugabe, his childhood friend advised serving police officers to emulate Kisembo’s deeds and observed that during his tenure as the Inspector General of Police, there were no cases of torture and maiming in Police cells.

Phiona Kisembo, the deceased's daughter said her father was full of love and respect for others.      

//Cue in; “He was a loving…  

Cue out… did that for you.”//   

The deceased’s Son Luke Kisembo narrated how his father rejected his request for a piece of land from UNAFRI, to start a washing bay after graduating from the university. He instead advised him to acquire land from Kitema in Kagadi then greater Hoima District, instead of plotting to personalize public property.  

//Cue in; he could not…. 

Cue out… he attached value.”// 

Similarly, IGP Martin Ochola said Kisembo was a mentor for many of the people with whom he served in the police force. 

//Cue in; “first of all…..  

Cue out…. Hard-working citizen.”//  

Jackson Karyakwabwe, the reigning Uganda Golf Captain said Kisembo always amused them with his hilarious jokes. Kisembo was the President Uganda Golf Union from 2009 to 2010 and the Chairman Police Sports Association (1992).

Born on October 1, 1955, Kisembo is survived by 17 children. He will be laid to rest tomorrow in Kagadi in Kitema along Mugalike -Isunga road.

His education roots stem from in 1963 and completed his Primary Leaving Education in 1969.  Kisembo studied his Ordinary Secondary Level at St Mary’s College Kisubi in 1971 to 1973 but completed at St. Edwards S.S.S. Bukuumi, where he obtained his East African Certificate of Education (EACE) in 1973. 

Kisembo then joined Old Kampala S.S.S and obtained his East African Advanced Certificate of Education (EAACE) in 1979.  He went on to join Makerere University, where he obtained a degree in Sociology. He joined Uganda Police Force (UPF) on March 12, 1980, with 26 others, for the initial Cadet/Assistant Superintendent of Police course, which was conducted at the Police College in Dar es Salaam.

His first posting as a Cadet was in Gulu District where he was posted on October 24, 1980, and began his remarkable journey in national policing. He was transferred from Gulu to the Eastern Region as the Regional Special Branch Officer-RSBO in 1981, and after 8 months, he was transferred to the Special Branch, Kampala area in march 1982.  

Kisembo was on December 20, 1982, and transferred to Karamoja. It is during his stay in Karamoja that he was appointed Regional Special Branch Officer, North Eastern, based at Moroto, in 983.  In the same year, he was confirmed as Assistant Superintendent of Police (ASP) and admitted to the pensionable establishment of the Public Service.  

Police says he quickly rose through the ranks, because of his great work ethics.  He was appointed Regional Special Branch Officer – South Western from 1984 – 1986, and thereafter as the Government Protective Security Officer Special Branch Headquarters from 1986 – 1990.  

Kisembo was in 1990, promoted to Assistant Commissioner of Police and appointed Deputy Director, Special Branch.  After two years, in March 1992, he was appointed the Director of Administration, Police Headquarters.  A month later, in April 1992, he was appointed, Deputy Inspector General of Police, in April 1992.  

Kisembo contributed greatly to policing through distinguished service at the National level.  His former colleagues called him a super police officer who was meticulous, highly professional and always gave thoughtful advice, including during the toughest times of his career.