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Kalaki, Kaberamaido Embark on Apiary Farming

Samuel Okello, the Amolatar District Entomologist is one of the facilitators training apiary farmers in both districts. He says beekeeping is the easiest way making cash since it allows farmers to engage in other activities to diversify their income.income sources.

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Kalaki and Kaberamaido districts are turning their energies to apiary farming following several disasters that have affected crop production. 

The two districts are currently training apiary farmers across all sub counties. 

At least 20 farmers have been identified and equipped in each sub county, according to Kalaki District Production Officer, Joseph Erau. 

He says bee keeping is cheaper and very convenient compared to other farming enterprises. He observes that erratic rain patterns have made both crop and livestock farming risky ventures. 

Erau says that they have already established a honey processing plant in Kaberamaido district to enable farmers benefit from apiary farming. 

Samuel Okello, the Amolatar District Entomologist is one of the facilitators training apiary farmers in both districts. 

He says beekeeping is the easiest way making cash since it allows farmers to engage in other activities to diversify their income.

   

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Charles Ekwaru, an Apiary farmer from Oyera D in Bululu Sub county, says bee keeping has enabled him save and invest more for his family. 

Ekwaru, who has over 200 beehives, says his life has changed because he has managed to produce graduates in his family using earnings from honey.  

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Emmanuel Etigu, another beekeeper in Aperikila Sub County says he has ventured into apiary after seeing some of his neighbors benefit. 

Etigu, who has already put up 33 beehives, says he hopes for good money in June this year. 

He wants to use apiary to create job opportunities for fellow youth in the area.