Breaking

Moroto Orphanage Home, Residents Bicker Over Land

The home was established by the late Bill Behrman who passed away in 2018 and in 2020 Rebekah Bullen inherited the orphanage, under the Mission Critical international.
Rebekah Bullen and the orpans at Mission Moroto orphanage home in Rupa subcounty

Audio 4

More than 150 orphans in Moroto Mission Orphanage home are living in fear of eviction over a land dispute with the community.

The home was established by the late Bill Behrman who passed away in 2018 and in 2020 Rebekah Bullen inherited the orphanage, under the Mission Critical international.

Bullen, the Managing Director of the home says that in 2007, Behrman acquired the land measuring 127 acres from elders and employed Noah Ewaru the former Mayor of Moroto Municipality to manage the orphanage.

Bullen says that when Behrman died, the donors continued sending money to Ewaru to run the organization.

According to Bullen, the donors received reports of mismanagement of funds by Ewaru, prompting them to appoint her managing director. However, this didn’t go well with Ewaru who grabbed some of the documents that include the land title.

Ewaru allegedly mobilized the community to chase Bullen and close the organization claiming that they had grabbed over 500 acres of land without a community concept.

Cue in ‘’the land that I fenced is only…

//Cue out ‘’ violent in the process.

John Bosco Iriama, a resident accuses Bullen of mismanaging the institution and planning to grab over 500 acres of their land.

//Cue in ‘’this lady is more of land title…

Cue out: “…the ones she got there’’.//

However, Ewaru who is on the run after assaulting Bullen couldn’t be reached for comment.

Margie Lolem, the Senior Probation Officer Moroto says that they assessed the home and it meets all the requirements. She adds that they don’t have any alternative place to relocate the children.

//Cue in: “issues related to home…

Cue out: “all these steps’’.//

According to the orphans, since the dispute emerged, they have received threats from the community.

Richard Louse, a 17-year-old orphan, says that they are not sure of what next if the organization is closed.

Moses Keem, another orphan said he fears that the situation is more likely to worsen if the land dispute is not addressed