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Muhokya School Struggling To Get Learners Back to Class

Lydia Nyakato, the head teacher Kahendero primary school in Kahedero, says that some of the learners in her school have taken on Boda bod riding while about three girls were taken to Kampala as house helps.
Enrolement of Sub Candidates remain low at all levels

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There is a poor turn up of learners at several schools in Muhokya sub-county Kasese District two weeks after the government reopened schools for semi candidates. Government allowed the semi candidates to report back after spending more than a year at home because of the COVID-19 pandemic.    

However, many schools in Muhokya Sub County, which neighbours Lake George and hosts pastoral communities are struggling to get back the learners. Francis Ronald Masereka, the head of sciences at Muhokya primary school says the turn up at the school is very poor. 

He explains that only 25 of 56 semi candidates at the school had returned by the second week. Masereka attributes the problem to parents who have neglected their responsibility to educate their children and exposed them to money.

 

//Cue in: “The issue of school fees…. 

Cue out: …with scholastic materials."//  

Lydia Nyakato, the head teacher Kahendero primary school in Kahedero, says that some of the learners in her school have taken on Boda bod riding while about three girls were taken to Kampala as house helps. She says that only 17 out of the 25 candidates reported back while only 20 out of the 31 semi candidates have reported.   

//Cue in: “Kahendero community has…    

Cue out: …this term.”// 

A number of people interviewed by URN attribute the problem to the high household levels, saying the majority of parents are unable to pay fees and provide scholastic materials to their children. Others say many girls got married while the boys have joined the fishing business at Kahendero landing site.

Elder Getrude Nakato, a grand mother of six says families are struggling financially because the prolonged drought season shuttered their gardens.   She argues that majority of the families heavily rely on agriculture to provide their needs including education.

Nakato however says that some parents especially fathers have deliberately failed to support their children and spend all their money on alcohol and extra marital affairs.

//Cue in: “Omusana abantu balime emere….   

Cue out: …kusomesa omwana tosobola.”//  

Haruna Biiba, a father of four says that he is unable to raise Shillings 140,000 needed for school fees because of economic challenges.  Biiba, who has been depending on agriculture to support his family, says the dry season affected his produce. 

//Cue in: “Embera siyiwene… 

Cue out: …nga erisoma.”// 

Luker Thembo, the Muhokya Cell Defense Secretary attributes the problem to domestic violence, which has forced families to breakup.

//Cue in: “obwokuba nyina...

Cue out: …yobyojjo atwekere omwisiki.”// 

Doreen Kiima, a primary seven candidate who wanted to join Muhokya primary school is still at home because of the failure by her parents to raise fees. Kiima left Kiburara primary school because the family was incapable of raising 53000 shillings needed per term. 

//Cue in: “My parents they don’t… 

Cue out: …ha primary aho muhokya."//

Sixteen- year-old Loyce Muhindo has been offering casual labor in the village to raise fees on her own. However, after accumulating huge school debts she has decided to abandon schooling. 

//Cue in: “Nenga byanga ninyiherera…

Cue out: …sente swamabula.”//

Ernest Thabugha the principal inspector of Schools Kasese, says there is need for joint mobilization of parents on the value of education.

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