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No Malice Intended in Tough Passport Interviews - Director of Immigration

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Most people applying for passports are forced to undergo second interviews because their letters of endorsement are suspicious.
Godfrey Sasagah, the Director of the Citizenship and Immigration Directorate, says the passport office has a big problme identifying people as truly Ugandan. He says this challenge is greatest in communities that live along the border.
There have been numerous complaints published in Uganda's print media about the harsh requirements for passport applicants. Many complaints are about double interviews, which are deemed unnecessary and an inconvinience.
Of specific concern are demands from passport officers that applicants prove their nationality by speaking their mother tongues and provide details of their unique clans and totems. However even when these details are given people can be turned away because they do not look Ugandan enough or suspicions regarding their nationality persist.
Sasagah says the passport office requires that all applicants produce letters of recommendation from their local council officials and their Resident District Commisioners. He explains that this is to establish identities and basic places of origin.
Sasagah says it is only when there are real doubts about the nationality of an applicant that people should be called in for a second interview.
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Sasagah says all passport officers are trained in fraud detection and document issuance and security. He says there is no malice intended in the second interviews because the passport officers are professional.