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Over 1,000 Acres of Crop Gardens Destroyed by Stray Elephants in Nwoya

Felix Onencan, a farmer in Agung village says he has suffered unimaginable loss after the elephants destroyed his crops and shuttered his investment. He told URN that he procured a bank loan and hired 300 acres of land on which he planted soybean which has all been ruined.
Residents of Agung village in Anaka Sub-County narrate their ordeal during a community meeting on Thursday

Audio 3

More than 1,000 acres of crop gardens have been destroyed in Nwoya district during an invasion by stray elephants from Murchison Falls National Park. 

The elephants overrun Agung village in Anaka Sub-County and ravaged gardens of sweet potatoes, banana plantations, maize, sugarcane, beans, soybeans, groundnuts, millet and sesame, among others. 

Felix Onencan, a farmer in Agung village says he has suffered unimaginable loss after the elephants destroyed his crops and shuttered his investment. He told URN that he procured a bank loan and hired 300 acres of land on which he planted soybean which has all been ruined.   

//Cue in; “I have hired... 

Cue out…pay back the loan?”//    

Onencan explains that he had invested up to 50 million Shillings on the farm including hiring land and buying agro-inputs among others. 

//Cue in; “If I tell you... 

Cue out… I am crying.”//  

Anaka Sub County Chairperson Godfrey Opobo says that data compiled by his office in collaboration with affected village Local Councils shows that at least 200 households have been affected by the invasion.

//Cue in; “Quite a number of...

Cue out… has overwhelmed them.”// 

In August, residents of Yagopino and Golla Villages in Pawat Omeru West parish in neighbouring Purongo Sub County suffered similar damages from the marauding elephants from Murchison Falls Park.  

Meanwhile, a number of households in Lii, Alero and Kochgoma Sub Counties that border the park have decried food insecurity and strained economic livelihoods following persistent destruction of crops by stray wild animals.

The families have tried planting peppers, use of beehives, digging trenches along the park boundary and clustering crops together among others to deter the animals but the methods have not worked for the community. 

Nwoya District Chairperson, Patrick Okello Oryema appealed to the government to prioritize the welfare of citizens in order to bring an end to the continued human-wildlife-related conflicts that have dragged on for too long.

Wilson Kagoro, the Conservation Warden of Murchison Falls National Park under Uganda Wildlife Authority (UWA) said he wasn’t aware of the incident by press time.