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Police to Construct Referral Hospital in Nsambya

Speaking to URN in an interview Assistant Inspector General of Police-AIGP Dr. Moses Byaruhanga, the Director of Health Services in Uganda Police Forces, says the top police administration prioritized the construction of the hospital this financial year after realizing that they lack a referral facility like the army despite being in existence for more than 100 years.
Police Doctors in this month's annual general meeting that was held at Police Headquarters in Naguru.

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The Police leadership has allocated five acres of land in Nsambya police barracks for the construction of a hospital this financial year.

Speaking to URN in an interview Assistant Inspector General of Police-AIGP Dr. Moses Byaruhanga, the Director of Health Services in Uganda Police Forces, says the top police administration prioritized the construction of the hospital this financial year after realizing that they lack a referral facility like the army despite being in existence for more than 100 years.      

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He explains that inadequate medical attention given to police personnel in government hospitals doesn’t only lead to slow recovery of police officers but also affects those in need of specialized treatment but can’t afford treatment in private hospitals. 

“Whenever you go to these government hospitals affordable to you, sometimes it’s difficult to get the proper treatment required mostly when it comes to serious illnesses. But even if you get that treatment, the recovery process takes so long, it has been affecting police with personnel being sick all the time. It results in manpower challenges in the force,” Byaruhanga noted. 

He is optimistic that the construction of a police owned hospital at Nsambya will be a game-changer for improved health services. “Currently we have 93 police clinics around the country which treat not only our officers but also members of the public free of charge. The construction of the police hospital will see more specialized services offered to our officers and the general public,” Byaruhanga argued.  

He however decried the understaffing and lack of accommodation facilities for police medical personnel. “Whenever there is a recruitment exercise, a special allocation should be given to the technical areas like Health sector, Engineering, ICT and forensics, such that Police can build capacity because it’s very difficult to get personnel from the general public to come and work in Police directorates,” he said.    

On Friday, during the annual general meeting of Police doctors, Major Gen. Jack Bakasumba, the chief of joint staff in Police, said many common Ugandans and police officers can’t afford the exorbitant cost of health services in hospitals in Kampala and other cities.  

“These days, when you go to these big hospitals before a doctor touches you. You must have paid millions whether you will be okay or not, it’s none of their business. Few Ugandans more so police officers can't afford it. That’s why we decided to build the capacity to handle our own officers,” Bakasumba said.

  However, the officers didn’t disclose how much money has been set aside for the hospital and when the construction work will start.

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