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School Arranges Delivery Room for Pregnant Pupil Sitting PLE

Lamunu Bernadette Mary, the deputy head teacher of the school says the teenager and her parents have been undergoing counseling sessions over the last seven months, to prevent her from dropping out of school or being forced into early marriage.
PLE SIGNAGE AT GULU PRISONS PRIMARY SCHOOL

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Gulu Prisons Primary School has overcome social pressure to facilitate a pregnant teenager sit the 2016 Primary Leaving Examinations (PLE) that started today across the country.  The teenager is among 105 candidates registered at the school.

Lamunu Bernadette Mary, the deputy head teacher of the school says the teenager and her parents have been undergoing counseling sessions over the last seven months, to prevent her from dropping out of school or being forced into early marriage.

The sessions were organized by the school as an initiative to inspire her to complete school.

Lamunu says the teenager was dully registered to sit for the final exams and equipped with class notes and past examination papers to prepare her for today. Despite missing lessons for seven months, the teenager has been revising and returned to school today.

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The move is in line with a 2009 government directive allowing pregnant girls in candidate classes to sit their final examinations.

However, despite the directive, girls are still victimized by schools, fellow pupils and communities. They are subjected to expulsion and suspension as a disciplinary measure to deter others from getting pregnant, forcing them to drop out of school.

Lamunu says their approach is to challenge such stigma and ensure that the girl child can still study despite pregnancy. She adds that the school has also prepared a labor suit for the teenager who is projected to deliver this week.

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Charles Apire, the head teacher of Gulu Prisons Primary School says the school prioritized girl child education as a measure to eliminate many challenges that force girls out of school. 

Grace Labongo, the head teacher of Kirombe Primary School says the impact of the modest policy should be celebrated by all stakeholders.

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The number of girls completing the education cycle in Uganda has been dwindling over the years. Primary school enrollment statistics indicate that although the enrollment at the primary level stands at 49 percent girls 51 percent boys, less than 30 percent of the girls who start primary one, complete Primary seven.