Breaking

President Museveni Calls for UPE Review

Top story
According to Museveni, he is still confused on which side to take as some people are suggesting that parents can afford contributing something towards the education of their children.
Ministers and MPs welcoming President Museveni at international youth day celebrations at Kampiringisa Rehabilitation Centre.

Audio 2

President, Yoweri Museveni has tasked the National Youth Council to inquiry from village council leaders on whether Universal Primary Education should be reviewed to allow monitory contributions from parents.

According to Museveni, he is still confused on which side to take as some people are suggesting that parents can afford contributing something towards the education of their children.

He disclosed this while presiding over the International Youth Day celebrations at

Kampiringisa Rehabilitation Center playgrounds in Mpigi district under the theme “Safe Spaces for Youths”.

Museveni explained that government spends huge sums on UPE and USE yet many government schools charge parents, which calls for a policy review.

Many schools, especially those in urban areas resolved to levy an optional Shillings 10,000 for lunch and Shillings 10,400 for utility bills like water and electricity. 

Museveni says he has failed to understand how the matter should be handled and therefore called from resolutions from village council leaders whom he believes are much aware of the status of people in their villages.

//Cue in: "I told you to… 

Cue out…what to do."//

He says government will take a decision after hearing from the local leaders.

//Cue in: "when I tried…

Cue out…you the youth."// 

Government rolled out UPE in 1997 and abolished all kinds of fees.

Primary school enrolment increased from 3.1 million pupils in 1996 to 7.6 million in 2003 following the introduction of UPE.

Government introduced Universal Secondary Education-USE ten years later to enable eligible primary school graduates enroll in secondary and vocational training institutions.

While government promised to pay the fees, parents were expected to provide scholastic materials and midday meals for the learners.