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Religious, Cultural Leaders in Rwenzori Region Commit to End GBV

In Kasese, more than 6,000 girls under the age of 19 years went for their first antenatal in various health facilities, and over 200 cases of violence against children were reported at police in 2021.
Participants of the advocacy engagement on child protection, VAC, GBV and harmful practices protection meeting agreed to work together to end the vices

Audio 6

Religious and cultural leaders in the Rwenzori region have committed to work together and end all acts of Gender-Based Violence-GBV.

The leaders say they are concerned about the raising GBV cases in the region that have been compounded by the COVID-19 effects.

In Kasese, more than 6,000 girls under the age of 19 years went for their first antenatal in various health facilities, and over 200 cases of violence against children were reported at police in 2021.

Reverend Alice Nabirwe from South Rwenzori Diocese promised to initiate programs to revitalize family life and values within the church teachings. She says that many couples especially men have not appreciated the value of courtship and marriage counseling.

//Cue in: “As a church we...

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Pastor Ezekiel Mutyanga, the Bishop of the SDA Church Rwenzori Region says that they will integrate messages against GBV in their daily religious sermons.   He said they recognize that many children are victims of violence perpetrated by their own parents and relatives.

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Grace Kimekeke, the President of Mothers Union Kasese Diocese said they have been trying to counsel conflicting couples and offering psychosocial support to abused young children.

She says that they have collectively agreed to set up systems to provide immediate protection and care for victims of GBV but also open partnerships with all other stakeholders advocating for the end of the vice.

 //Cue in: “But unfortunately mothers... 

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Sheikh Nasib Musenene working with Uganda Muslim Supreme Council-UMSC attributes the conservative negative cultural practices for the increasing cases of GBV in most rural communities. Musenene says that he is pleased that the cultural leaders have opted to be at the front in this fight against negative practices.

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The Obusinga Bwa Rwenzururu-OBR Prime Minister Joseph Kule Muranga says that they have amended the OBR constitution and discarded all negative cultural practices. The amended constitution is now advocating for equality between men and women and guarding young children against harmful practices. 

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Records show that women in Uganda aged 15-49 years have experienced violence and more than 1 in every 5 women aged 15-24 have experienced sexual violence in their lifetime.


Estimates for violence against children also show that violence against the girl child is high at more than 59% for young females prior to 19 years.