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Special Needs Schools Wait for Gov't Grants Two Weeks After Reopening

Sarah Nakabuye, the headteacher of Masaka School for Children with Special Needs-Ndegeya says that although the biggest percentage of their learners have returned, the school is constrained due to financial challenges.
24 Jan 2022 10:51
Sarah Nakabuye, headteacher of Masaka School for Children with Special Needs-Ndegeya,attending learners in class

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Special Needs Schools are struggling to operate due to the delayed release of funds by the government. Special Needs Schools resumed their operations on January 10th, 2022 following the nearly two-year closure of schools to contain the spread of COVID-19. 

However, more than two weeks after the resumption of studies, the schools are yet to receive funding from the government for their operations. Some of the affected schools are Mbale Secondary and Vocational School for the Deaf in Mbale district, Ndegeya School for Children with Special Needs in Masaka city, Misanvu Special Needs Education Unit in Bukomansimbi district, and Entebbe Children’s Welfare Primary School among others.  

  

Sarah Nakabuye, the headteacher of Masaka School for Children with Special Needs-Ndegeya says that although the biggest percentage of their learners have returned, the school is constrained due to financial challenges.  She reveals that the school is yet to receive their capitation and special grants from the government yet parents are also less supportive to the learners.

//Cue in: “we have not yet…..    

Cue out; ….education part,”//   

Luganda  

//Cue in: “ensimbi ezo….  

 

Cue out; ….nti kitukosezza,”//   

Sister Rose Nelima, the headteacher for Mbale Secondary and Vocational School for the Deaf has also decried the delayed release of funds, saying it is hampering the school operations including key priorities such as rehabilitation of structures, clearing of accumulated utility bills, and purchase of instructional materials and food among others. 

 

She has appealed to the government to urgently address their plight to enable them effectively offer services to students. Sister Nelima says that although they are still waiting for other students to report back, the school needs the money to make all the necessary preparations for effective teaching.    

    

    

//Cue in: “they are still….    

Cue out; …..not yet received,”//

Paddy Khauka, the Mbale District Inspector of Schools, says that they have notified the ministry of education about the challenges which promised to address them in a short while.   Similarly, Alice Kyamiza Basaza, the headteacher of Entebe Children’s Welfare Primary School says that they have also not received funding. 

She however indicates that in their case, the delay to access funds is partly attributed to the late constitution of the School Management Committee, which is supposed to grant her permission to their bank account.    

//Cue in: “capitation grant….  

Cue out; ….coming back,”//     

In Kampala, managers of schools for Children with Special Needs are reporting a low turn-up of learners, which they blame on the parent’s low attitude to the education of children in this category. 

Juliet Mary Tumuhairwe, the headteacher of Ntinda School for the Deaf, says that before the lockdown the school had 217 pupils but so far only 165 have reported back.

Pius Oketcho, the headteacher of Mulago School for the Deaf, says that out of the population of 207 learners they had before lockdown, 110 have so far returned. The parents of the remaining children are still giving excuses of financial constraints.  

//cue in;’’ We opened and… 

Cue out…cannot manage,‘’//      

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