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Towns in Wakiso Lacking Public Toilets

Michel Ssenoga, operating in Kira town, says lack of public toilets has forced some people in the municipality to resort to desperate means of disposing their waste like defecating in open areas, incomplete buildings and street corridors.
A view of Nansana Municipality

Audio 5

Urban centres in Wakiso District are lacking public toilets leaving people to practices open defecation.

In the municipalities of Nansana, Kira, Makindye-Sabagabo and some parts of Kasangati, there are no public places of convenience.    

Immaculate Nassuuna, resident of Mende shares that one day she visited Nansana but struggled when nature called. 

“I moved around looking for a public toilet in vain. I had to ask for help from shopkeepers to allow me to use a facility on their building, some of them denied me access saying the facilities, which are kept under lock and key, are limited to only tenants,” Nassuuna recollects.    

Michel Ssenoga, a businessman in Kira town, says lack of public toilets has forced some people in the municipality to resort to desperate means of disposing their waste like defecating in open areas, incomplete buildings and street corridors. 

//Cue in “Bwekituuka mwebyo…

Cue out…mubitundu ebyenjawulo.”//     

In March, the Ministry of Health named Wakiso alongside Mityana and Mukono as the least performing districts as far as sanitation is concerned.  

Richard Zzimbe, another resident, argues that the pace of development in Wakiso is yet to be matched by accessible and functional toilet amenities. He, however, blames the district authorities and leaders. 

Zzimbe says that the authorities should construct public toilets in developing urban centres and along major highways. 

//Cue in “Obuzibu bwetusanze…

Cue out…tuli bubi.”//  

Isaac Galabuzi, the Wakiso District Water Officer attributes the failure to construct places of convenience to lack of land and inadequate funds.     

“The sanitation programs are allocated meagre resources. However, at times we want to prioritize the matter but still, we don’t have land where we can put up these facilities. If individuals from several areas can allocate us some land we can look for means of funding the construction,” says Galabuzi.        

David Ssekaboga, the District Senior Environmental Health Officer, observes that although they have been fighting to attain 100 percent household toilet coverage, they have done little or even nothing in ensuring that there are public facilities in urban areas.

  //Cue in: “This challenge is…

Cue out...such facilities.”//   

In 2012, Makerere University’s College of Engineering Design, Art and Technology-CEDAT embarked on innovation to design a smart mobile toilet which they hoped to solve the problem of poor human waste disposal that has dogged many urban centres.

Although Ssekaboga says that it is one of the best alternatives, he, however, notes that this is as well limited by the absence of sewage treatment plants within the district.    

//Cue in: “We don’t have…

Cue out…treatment facilities.”//    

Ssekaboga adds that to address the challenge, they are proposing to have a public-private partnership. 

//Cue in: “One of the approach…

Cue out…competing priorities.”//   

A recent media report by the voice of Africa indicates that around 2.5 billion mostly in developing towns and cities of Africa and Asia are at a crisis lacking access to adequate public toilets which lowers the possibility of attaining the SDG 6 by the year 2030.