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UPDF, Police Set Up Team to Investigate Source of Threatening Leaflets

The joint team consists of forensic, ICT and investigation experts drawn from the Directorate of Forensic Science, Crime Intelligence, Criminal Investigations Directorate, Internal Security Organizations and Chieftainancy of Military Intelligence.
National CCTV Command Centre

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The Police and military agencies have set up a team to track the sources of anonymous threatening leaflets that have been dropped in various parts of the country. The leaflets have been dropped in areas of Masanafu in Lubaga Division, Kawempe Division, Nsangi, Mukono, Jinja and Mityana municipalities.

The joint team consists of forensic, ICT and investigation experts drawn from the Directorate of Forensic Science, Crime Intelligence, Criminal Investigations Directorate, Internal Security Organisations and Chieftaincy of Military Intelligence.

Police Spokesperson, Fred Enanga, said some of the officers on the teams are reviewing Closed Circuit Television –CCTV footage retrieved in places where anonymous intimidating letters have been dropped.

Enanga explains that the purpose of gathering and reviewing CCTV videos is to ensure strangers seen dropping the letters are tracked and arrested. Other personnel on the team are tasked to analyse the handwriting on the walls and letters with a view of finding groups behind the attempt to cause worry and fear among members of the public.

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Digital security analyst, Paul Senoga, believes that matters of anonymous threats and other crime-related incidents like theft, burglary and robbery can be addressed if security agencies rally the public to embrace digital security. Senoga argues that people have not realised that a security gadget of about 400,000 shillings can protect their property, home and family members.

“People do not see the reason for having electronic security gadgets in their cars, home or workplace. Some people argue that their properties are cheap or old. But you ask him whether he can give it out for free and he refuses. When it gets lost, that is when you see the value. Installing a tracking device of 400,000 shillings or a security alarm protects the property, family and eases investigation in case of a crime,” Senoga argues.

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Senoga cites an example of a home that was broken into in Muyenga in Kampala where valuables were taken but also victims assaulted. Senoga explains that the culprits were arrested from Namuwongo with the help of a chip installed in a mere 32-inch flat television screen.

Enanga agrees with Senoga that people need to have crime deterrence measures such as security lights, dogs, security alarms and CCTV cameras. Security says places that have such installations are often avoided by criminal elements.

UPDF Deputy Spokesperson, Lt Col Ronald Kakurungu, says the army and its intelligence agencies working alongside police will ensure incidents similar to those that have happened in Masaka are dealt with precisely. Lt Col Kakurungu calls upon the public particularly those in areas threatened with attacks to remain calm.

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Security has also criticized some sections of the media that are linking every crime incident to the machete killings in Masaka. Enanga says even incidents of isolated crime like gangs that raided a home in Nansana –Katoke are being regarded as machete attacks yet these were isolated robbers.

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